Thursday, 17 October 2013

The Story behind Phineas and Ferb



By Alejandra Gerena (undergraduate FIGRI student, level 4 English)

We have all seen or watched the popular series Phineas and Ferb. However, there is an urban legend behind this series that tells a terrible story, and which the Disney Channel allegedly used to create the show.

The story revolves around Candace Flynn, a little girl who lived in the village of Iultin, Germany, in 1993. After her parents got divorced, Candace’s mother took care of her, but she didn’t pay attention to her daughter.

Everything got worse when her brother Phineas, who suffered from hyperactivity, was born, and even worse when her half-brother Ferb arrived. For a long time, she made up extraordinary feats performed by her brothers, and told her mother about this. Her mother saw what was happening with Candace, and decided to take her to a psychiatrist called Heinz Doofenshmirtz. This psychiatrist prescribed a powerful medicine that controlled Candace’s impulses. However, at the same time this drug created an addiction within her that led her to take stronger drugs like LSD.

As Candace felt that nobody, and especially her mother, was paying attention to her, she decided to write a diary in which she described the adventures of her brothers each day.

At the age of 14, Candace was found dead in her room after taking an overdose, and she had left a suicide note written in her diary. Her mother decided to sell this diary to Disney.

Without any doubt, it’s a frightening story. However, as I said before, this is an urban legend and it might not be true. It just depends on each person and whether they want to believe it or not.

3 comments:

  1. This isn't true, I am not putting you down or anything I just wanna tell you. I was literally wanting to find out if this true or not and I read something about how the creator of P and F decided to make it and how long it took for them to pitch in their idea to disney. But I love this story behind P and F its intriguing.

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